Down-to-Earth Spirituality

Unlike the Torah narrative that begins “In the Beginning,” a blog begins at the end. This "Torah Tweets" blog displays its narrative in reverse chronological order with the most recent post appearing first. The new blog http://bibleblogyourlife.blogspot.com was created to reverse the order of the blog posts in this blog to begin in the beginning. Both the new book http://photographgod.com and blog invite you to explore creative ways to photograph God in all that happens in your everyday life while crafting a vibrant dialogue between your story and the Bible’s story.

Postdigital Narrative on Spiritual Dimensons of Everyday Life ///// "For the Lord thy God walketh in the midst of thy camp." (Deuteronomy 23:15) ///// "Judaism does not direct its gaze upward but downward ... does not aspire to a heavenly transcendence, nor does it seek to soar upon the wings of some abstract, mysterious spirituality. It fixes its gaze upon concrete, empirical reality permeating every nook and cranny of life. The marketplace, the factory, the street, the house, the mall, the banquet hall, all constitute the backdrop of religious life." (R. Joseph B. Soloveitchik) ///// "It is not enough for the Jew to rest content with his own spiritual ascent, the elevation of his soul in closeness to G-d, he must strive to draw spirituality down into the world and into every part of it - the world of his work and his social life - until not only do they not distract him from his pursuit of G-d, but they become a full part of it." (R. Menachem M. Schneerson) ///// "If there is a religious agency in our lives, it has to appear in the manner of our times. Not from on high, but a revelation that hides itself in our culture, it will be ground-level, on the street, it'll be coming down the avenue in the traffic, hard to tell apart from anything else." (E. L. Doctorow) ///// "The first message that Moses chose to teach the Jewish people as they were about to enter the Land of Israel was to fuse heaven to earth, to enable the mundane to rise up and touch the Divine, the spiritual to vitalize the physical, not only as individuals but as an entire nation." (R. Abraham Y. Kook)


Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Terumah (Contribution) תרומה

Kabbalah/Parallel To One Another 

Make 50 loops on one tapestry and 50 loops on the edge of the second tapestry so that are parallel (maKBiLot) to one another.  
Make 50 golden fasteners to join the tapestries together so that the Tabernacle should be one. (Exodus: 26:5,6)
חמשים ללאת תעשה ביריעה האחת וחמשים ללאת תעשה בקצה היריעה אשר במחברת השנית מקבילת הללאת אשר אל אחתה  ועשית חמשים קרסי זהב וחברת את היריעת אשר אל אחתה בקרסים והיה המשכן אחד

 
 The Tabernacle was not covered by one tapestry canopy, but by two that complement one another

The word maKBiLot in this Torah portion is the source of the word KaBaLah, an exploration of parallel creative processes, Divine and human

This parallelism between human creativity and Divine Creation is derived from the confluence of two scriptural passages

The Tabernacle’s chief artist Bezalel was filled with a Divine spirit, with Wisdom, Understand, and Knowledge and with artistic talent (Exodus: 31:3
God founded the earth in Wisdom, established heavens in Understanding, and with Knowledge the depths opened and skies dripped dew. (Proverbs: 3:19-20

Wisdom, Understanding, Knowledge are only found together in the Bible to describe the creative artist and God, the Creator of the universe
Kabbalah invites us to discover spiritual secrets of God’s Creation through gaining insight into our own creative process

Having been created in the image of God (Genesis 1:27), every person has the potential to create new worlds, to renew the cosmos  
When you photograph God with the creative eyes of an artist you become God’s partner in creation

My grandson Or created photographs of the majestic Negev mountains where he lives, studies and works as a professional photographer

He explored the desert’s diversity with his creative lens: trees, migrating birds, ibex at the Ramon Crater, and first blooms of spring
 
 

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